Published on February 4, 2016

Full reports of NHS Citizen Assembly and Citizens’ Jury now published

Citizens for public services NHS Citizen

By Harry Farmer

Harry Farmer is a policy researcher at Involve. He is fascinated by the power of deliberative processes to enable governments to negotiate controversial policy decisions - particularly those presented by emerging technologies and demographic change. He currently works primarily on the Citizens for Public Service programme.

The NHS Citizen team are pleased to announce that the full reports of the NHS Citizen Assembly and Citizens’ Jury are now available to download and view online. The reports provide an account of the discussions that took place at both events, as well providing detail about their purpose, structure and outcomes.

Download the NHS Citizens’ Jury report:-
as a PDF; or
as a Microsoft Word document.

Download the NHS Citizen Assembly report:-
as a PDF; or
as a Microsoft Word document.

Download the glossary of terms used in the Assembly report:-
as a PDF; or
as a Microsoft Word document.

The Citizens’ Jury was a two day event held in Stoke on Trent at which fifteen randomly selected members of the local population discussed which topics should be taken forward to the NHS Citizen Assembly in the following month.

After careful consideration, the jurors voted for the following topics to go forward to the NHS Citizen Assembly:

  • Support for people with dementia post-diagnosis
  • Comprehensive psychosocial approaches to mental health
  • Improving health outcomes for looked after children and young people
  • Transparency in Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) decision making
  • Preventing premature deaths

The NHS Citizen Assembly was a one day event held in East London featuring over 200 participants, at which citizens discussed five topics relating to healthcare in England with representatives from NHS England, including members of the NHS England board. The discussions at the event were focused on establishing what citizens considered the current situation to be, what an improved situation might look like and what steps might be taken to get from the current situation to the improved one.

The discussions at the Citizen Assembly were notable for the diversity of thought and the wealth of ideas and perspectives voiced. Despite this, several themes did emerge strongly across many of the groups:

  • People are broadly positive about the quality of services, but want there to be more information about what services are on offer and want services to be more universally available.
  • People want their journeys through care to be simpler and better coordinated.
  • People want health services to place a greater emphasis onprevention.
  • People want health services to aspire to improve people’s overall health, rather than just to cure specific conditions.
  • People want more information and choice regarding the kind of treatments they receive.
  • People believe there needs to be more education about health and the health and social care system – and that better education will make many other positive changes possible.
  • Many non-clinical elements of care are best provided by either by family, the community or by voluntary organisations.

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