Tag Archive for "pathways-through-participation"

Reframing conflict

April 17, 2012 – Ingrid Prikken

This post explores the challenges of conflict to effective participation. Should we reframe our approach to dealing with conflict in light of the localism agenda? A few weeks ago Involve and Consumer Focus hosted a seminar to explore ‘where next for localism and co-production?’ Consumer Focus launched their research into participation and active citizenship –…

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Where next for localism and co-production?

April 3, 2012 – Tim Hughes

On 15 March 2012, Involve co-hosted with Consumer Focus a seminar exploring ‘where next for localism and co-production?’ The event brought together a group of 27 individuals from national government, local government, the voluntary and community sector, the social innovation field, academia and think tanks to explore some of the challenges and opportunities for localism and co-production in the coming…

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Crowdsourcing from first principles

January 23, 2012 – Simon Burall

The use of crowdsourcing in policy making may be a relatively new phenomenon. However, the principles that should guide its use are not.  This is the first in a ‘series of three posts. The series is based on a talk I gave at the Institute for Government at their 'Crowdsourcing Policy' event, 23rd January 2012. Crowdsourcing,…

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Pathways through Participation

November 30, 2011 – Tim Hughes

Pathways through Participation was a two and a half year (April 2009 - November 2011) qualitative research project, which aimed to improve our understanding of how and why people participate, how their involvement changes over time, and what pathways, if any, exist between different activities.

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path

The end of one pathway

October 26, 2011 – Tim Hughes

This blog post is featured from Involve’s newsletter. Sign up for the newsletter on our homepage. Pathways through Participation Researcher Tim Hughes explores some of the implications from the research findings, and the further questions that it raises. The past month has been an exciting time at Involve with the launch of the Pathways through Participation final report…

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Leeds Town Hall

Rebuilding the political

October 24, 2011 – Annie Quick

At last week’s pathways event on local engagement in democracy, conversation focused on how to overcome negative perceptions of formal participation and the dangers of not doing so. Last week, the Pathways team held a seminar looking at the implications of their research for local engagement in democracy. You can see the briefing paper here. A key…

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Lens on shelf showing upside down image projected on wall

The bitesize Pathways through Participation report

September 13, 2011 – Simon Burall

The Pathways through Participation report was published today. Is it possible to boil down over two years of research and hundreds of hours of interviews into one finding?  It's important to be wary about boiling research findings down too much. Oversimplification can hide and confuse much more than it illuminates. For a project the size…

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Pathways through Participation findings launched!

September 13, 2011 – Tim Hughes

Today, 13 September 2011, sees the launch of the findings of the Pathways through Participation project, a major two-and-a-half year study of active citizenship. The project has been funded by the Big Lottery Fund, and carried out by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO), the Institute for Volunteering Research (IVR) and Involve. The project…

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Measuring active citizenship

July 27, 2011 – Tim Hughes

The RSA recently published – ‘The Civic Pulse’ - a report that takes the first steps towards developing a new model for measuring active citizenship, or more specifically ‘the presence or absence of key mechanisms and social assets driving participation’. The authors of the ‘The Civic Pulse’ identify that in the current policy, social and economic contexts,…

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